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Heading for 80F today as was yesterday - what a day to fly.  The Airfoillabs Kingair from Anacortes down to Renton.

 

Off Anacortes southeast bound.

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Deception Pass separating Fidalgo Island from Whidbey Island.

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Along Puget Sound.

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Short final at Renton - Redmond (home of Microsoft) in right background.

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Yep , April in the PNW ; 80F today and then snow in the Mountains tonight . Thanks to a vigorous “Back Door Clipper” 

from Alberta into our area tonight . 

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A beautiful cloudy 68F in the GV at the moment.  The summer heat is a distant memory.B)

Although with my memory everything is distant!:o:wacko::lol:

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Some royal shots here!

But you may to to throw in metric numbers, mates, I can´t get what you are talking about. Spring will bring sun and about 15-18°C today here.

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19 hours ago, Stillwater said:

Some royal shots here!

But you may to to throw in metric numbers, mates, I can´t get what you are talking about. Spring will bring sun and about 15-18°C today here.

With 0C=32F - a bad place to start but as you advance up the scale 20C/68F getting warm 30C/86F really warm 40C/104F too damn hot.  As a former Alaskan I've encountered where 'C' and 'F' meet - -40 degrees.

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20 hours ago, Stillwater said:

Some royal shots here!

But you may to to throw in metric numbers, mates, I can´t get what you are talking about. Spring will bring sun and about 15-18°C today here.

For a rough idea Gerold, take off 30 and divide the remainder by 2.

So 100F is 100 minus 30 = 70, then divide by 2 is 35C. I think from memory 100F is actually 37.8 but that will give you a rough idea.:)

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5 hours ago, olderndirt said:

With 0C=32F - a bad place to start but as you advance up the scale 20C/68F getting warm 30C/86F really warm 40C/104F too damn hot.  As a former Alaskan I've encountered where 'C' and 'F' meet - -40 degrees.

I remembered the -40 equal point, but the rest I always forget. I like your scale "bad" / "warm" / "really warm" / "too damn hot".

In India or Coober Pedy there are even higher descriptions, like "50°C = Summer day (India)" or "50°C = drank 7 litres and no need to go to the toilet (Coober Pedy)“

 

4 hours ago, VH-KDK said:

For a rough idea Gerold, take off 30 and divide the remainder by 2.

So 100F is 100 minus 30 = 70, then divide by 2 is 35C. I think from memory 100F is actually 37.8 but that will give you a rough idea.:)

That looks like a math genius, Martyn, but quite applicable...

The celsius definition is so easy (water freezing / boiling), whatever drove the English to follow something else... :D. And I heard they even drive on the wrong side of the road :blink:!

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3 hours ago, Stillwater said:

I remembered the -40 equal point, but the rest I always forget. I like your scale "bad" / "warm" / "really warm" / "too damn hot".

In India or Coober Pedy there are even higher descriptions, like "50°C = Summer day (India)" or "50°C = drank 7 litres and no need to go to the toilet (Coober Pedy)“

 

That looks like a math genius, Martyn, but quite applicable...

The celsius definition is so easy (water freezing / boiling), whatever drove the English to follow something else... :D. And I heard they even drive on the wrong side of the road :blink:!

Imagine at being school and dealing with the imperial measurement system as well as Pounds, shillings and pence.

Metric is so easy but there again us English have a penchant for making things difficult.

Yes, I did find it rather daunting driving on the right when overseas the other year but luckily I am still here to tell the tale.

The underground houses in Coober Pedy were amazing, 24C all the year round apparently. The house we were shown around even had a used fireplace and the owner said that despite it being 24C, it felt cold in the winter. I wonder where they got the firewood from. 

What did you drink 7 litres of Gerold. If it was something too strong maybe you either forgot or didn't realise you had taken a leak!:huh::o:-[

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9 hours ago, VH-KDK said:

Imagine at being school and dealing with the imperial measurement system as well as Pounds, shillings and pence.

Metric is so easy but there again us English have a penchant for making things difficult.

Oh you are right, I can imagine that. Crazy & confusing!

 

9 hours ago, VH-KDK said:

Yes, I did find it rather daunting driving on the right when overseas the other year but luckily I am still here to tell the tale.

You make the point: Still there to tell. Same success for me the other way round.

 

9 hours ago, VH-KDK said:

The underground houses in Coober Pedy were amazing, 24C all the year round apparently. The house we were shown around even had a used fireplace and the owner said that despite it being 24C, it felt cold in the winter. I wonder where they got the firewood from.

I took that photo somewhat north of Coober Pedy, when we collected the firewood for our barbie. I would think the same dry wood appears near the Opal mines, too.

50FWdua.jpg

 

9 hours ago, VH-KDK said:

What did you drink 7 litres of Gerold. If it was something too strong maybe you either forgot or didn't realise you had taken a leak!:huh::o:-[

Drank so much I did not realise a leak? No. I just cited the saying about temperature I read in a text about the Opal miners there. Key is they sweat the liquid off, no need for other ways to digest it.

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14 hours ago, VH-KDK said:

Imagine at being school and dealing with the imperial measurement system as well as Pounds, shillings and pence.

Metric is so easy but there again us English have a penchant for making things difficult.

Yes, I did find it rather daunting driving on the right when overseas the other year but luckily I am still here to tell the tale.

The underground houses in Coober Pedy were amazing, 24C all the year round apparently. The house we were shown around even had a used fireplace and the owner said that despite it being 24C, it felt cold in the winter. I wonder where they got the firewood from. 

What did you drink 7 litres of Gerold. If it was something too strong maybe you either forgot or didn't realise you had taken a leak!:huh::o:-[

When the wheel's on the left, driving on the right is easy.  Several years we stayed at a Kyle of Loch Alsh B&B along with a couple from Belgium.  They had their left hand drive auto with them so I asked how that was, driving on the left.  He smiled at his wife and said 'you have to trust your partner when you pass'.

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10 hours ago, Stillwater said:

Oh you are right, I can imagine that. Crazy & confusing!

 

You make the point: Still there to tell. Same success for me the other way round.

 

I took that photo somewhat north of Coober Pedy, when we collected the firewood for our barbie. I would think the same dry wood appears near the Opal mines, too.

50FWdua.jpg

 

Drank so much I did not realise a leak? No. I just cited the saying about temperature I read in a text about the Opal miners there. Key is they sweat the liquid off, no need for other ways to digest it.

I didn't realise there was so much wood out there. I visited there 36 years ago is a long time when I cannot remember what I went to the fridge for!

Of course hydration is the key to survival in the outback heat.

Always sad to hear of people who have expired because of lack of water.

 

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5 hours ago, olderndirt said:

When the wheel's on the left, driving on the right is easy.  Several years we stayed at a Kyle of Loch Alsh B&B along with a couple from Belgium.  They had their left hand drive auto with them so I asked how that was, driving on the left.  He smiled at his wife and said 'you have to trust your partner when you pass'.

Yes, in the early 60s dad drove us down to SPain for 2 weeks holidays and we trusted mum, who didnt have a license, when overtaking. Another advantage of France was the straighter roads. 

Ah, the good old days!

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