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Rodger Pettichord

Anyone flown the Goose?

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Hi all. A story I am writing features the Grumman Goose. Has anyone actually flown a Goose and, if so, do your remember any peculiarities and quirks that might be interesting?  I've "flown" the flight sim version but never even been in the real thing.

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Well Rodger I am not a pilot. But I did have the pleasure flying in one back in the 70ties as a Deputy Sheriff picking up one of our bad boys in Bella Bella. Taking off from Vancouver BC South Terminal on dry pavement and crawling into water was amazing in it self. At first the co pilot controlled the throttles than the captain "smacked"(gently) the co pilots hand and took over. He pushed those throttles to take off and wow I never forget that incredible feeling of taking off in a "flying boat. It just seems like you're in a submarine the water pushed by those powerful engines seems to submerge the entire aircraft it is mind blowing. I just hope and wish that these great airplanes stay with us for a long, long time. I personally would hop into one any time. Bye the bye my "bad" boy I picked up in Bella Bella was just as impressed. In FSX the Goose made by Milton Shupe is quite realistic. Please remember I was only an impressed passenger but even the basic version in FSX is not bad at all and it does remind me of the real thing. 

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The only flying boat I've flown is the CL215 water bomber. In the spring during training we'd land, stop, taxi around and take off from the water. It was a really interesting experience. Otherwise except for picking up a load of water the operations were from land. I quite enjoyed that aspect of spring training.

Dave

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12 hours ago, porsche said:

The only flying boat I've flown is the CL215 water bomber. In the spring during training we'd land, stop, taxi around and take off from the water. It was a really interesting experience. Otherwise except for picking up a load of water the operations were from land. I quite enjoyed that aspect of spring training.

 Dave

 

Dave: the CL215 must itself be something of a kick to fly. I have the simple freeware version in flight sim and enjoy it. The real Big Boys' version surely feels like The Joy of Flight.

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Hi Rodger

 

I had it with FSX but haven't got it with P3D and what's worse is I since had a new 'puter and can't finf it anywhere.  Can you tell me the source please.

 

Incidentally, I would like to read the story you're writing.  Will it be available on Amazon Kindle?

 

John

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I'm sure there used to be a way of getting in touch without every man and his dog seeing what you're writing.  I'll have a look and let you know.

 

John

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That is why the Private message is so named.

Click on the name of the person you wish to send a private message to and you will see, in their 

profile, a tab labelled "Message".

Click on that tab, type your message and when you have finished, click on "Send".

In order to see any reply, you will need to check and see if there is a red marker against the envelope

icon that is just to the left of your user name on every page of this forum.

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Chevron Oil used to operate a couple of G-21's out of New Orleans Lakefront Airport in the early 60's.

 

While talking with its pilot I learned that if you lost an engine at its full gross weight it would give you a nice comfortable 100 to 150 ft rate of decent so he always maintained a couple of thousand feet en route.  

 

Dale

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When flying most GA aircraft on one engine always remember the old saying:

 

"It has just enough power to get you to the scene of the crash!"

 

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Another story.  When an (now out of business) Alaska airline, Northern Consolidated, got their F27's one of their more popular routes PANC V440 PAMC immediately become a problem.  The minimum enroute altitude on about 100 miles of that airway is 10000 ft.  IFR flying in a twin requires the ability to maintain the MEA on one engine - the F27 couldn't do that so a cunning plan was  devised with the FAA.  On leaving PANC westbound or PAMC eastbound, they climbed to FL200,  from this altitude it was calculated they could drift down on one engine and reach either destination successfully.  Other than for approval, this was never put to the real life test.

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On ‎5‎/‎25‎/‎2018 at 3:53 PM, Rodger Pettichord said:

Hi all. A story I am writing features the Grumman Goose. Has anyone actually flown a Goose and, if so, do your remember any peculiarities and quirks that might be interesting?  I've "flown" the flight sim version but never even been in the real thing.

I have almost 850 hours in the Grumman Albatross, the big brother of the Goose.  (I was in air rescue service in 1957)

I have both on my sim .

Peculiarities

1. Getting used to not having any power. (Intercepted a c-124 that had lost an engine over the Atlantic...…(We started back and it outran us into Sidi Slimane, Morocco)

2.Open sea landing…..Parallel swells, full flaps, 75 knots, chop throttles, stall, fall into sea, immediate prop reverse...….big splash, acft actually goes goes underwater while crew huddles in terror in the back.

3. In a rough sea, you might or might not be able to get enough airspeed to break the water surface tension and fly, so extended ocean taxiing  was often needed.

 

 

And so on...….anything specific you need?

(Never understood why more  of them were not recycled to SeaWorld later on as a carnival thrill ride)

 

 

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Lawrence. Just what I am looking for. Definitely usable!

You asked for further questions...oh yeah!

1. Since the Goose has no water rudder, how did you do fine-tuned steering? Was engine differential enough? Especially coming to a specific dock-point?

2. Since the Goose required hand-pumping to lower the landing gear, how hard was that? Did it take a lot of pumps? Same questions for raising the gear.

3. Many Goose controls are on the upper panel, with levers and switches and buttons overlapping. How tough is it to sort through and use properly under stress?

4. At what point during a descent to a water landing did you extend the floats?

5. What peculiarities did pilots become fond of after some time in a Goose?

 

Thanks much!

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15 hours ago, Rodger Pettichord said:

Lawrence. Just what I am looking for. Definitely usable!

You asked for further questions...oh yeah!

1. Since the Goose has no water rudder, how did you do fine-tuned steering? Was engine differential enough? Especially coming to a specific dock-point?

2. Since the Goose required hand-pumping to lower the landing gear, how hard was that? Did it take a lot of pumps? Same questions for raising the gear.

3. Many Goose controls are on the upper panel, with levers and switches and buttons overlapping. How tough is it to sort through and use properly under stress?

4. At what point during a descent to a water landing did you extend the floats?

5. What peculiarities did pilots become fond of after some time in a Goose?

 

Thanks much!

OK....let me refuel my memory and I'll post some answers.

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8 hours ago, lawrence aldrich said:

OK....let me refuel my memory and I'll post some answers.

Howdy Lawrence. While you refuel ( hopefully with the right fuel) your memory, I would respectfully request more of your life experiences with as a Pilot (or anything else not classified). Cheers Karl. 

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On ‎6‎/‎22‎/‎2018 at 10:29 PM, flyingleaf said:

Howdy Lawrence. While you refuel ( hopefully with the right fuel) your memory, I would respectfully request more of your life experiences with as a Pilot (or anything else not classified). Cheers Karl. 

I'm a product of the original USAF Aviation Cadet program of the 50s. Spent 20 years in the AF, retired in 1974 as a command pilot.

 

Over that period I've been qualified to crash in a few birds......a few of which are T-6G,  F-80 (right, the original and first jet fighter we had...I may be the only one still alive that has actually flown one) T-33 (before and after they installed the titanium buckets to keep the old J-33 engine from tossing them off the engine in flight )  F-100, B-25, B26, C-47, C-54, Grumman Albatross, T-34, and probably a few more I've forgotten about.

Flew O-1 Bird Dogs and O-2 Cessna Skymasters as a FAC in Vietnam 1967. (almost a thousand hours there and 99 Combat missions in the North end)

I've only flown one glider, and that was a T-33 on a test hop after engine change.

(Which is why I have one l less landing than takeoffs on my record.)

 

Fairly interesting times, and the retirement pay is very nice.

 

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Hi you two.

 

You've reminded me. I had the Grumman Goose in FSX days and it was fun to manouvre on water using the engines only.   I got quite good of it in the end.  Then P3D happened!   I'm off to Sim Market.

 

And like Karl, I would like to hear more please.

 

John

      

 

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22 hours ago, lawrence aldrich said:

I'm a product of the original USAF Aviation Cadet program of the 50s. Spent 20 years in the AF, retired in 1974 as a command pilot.

 

Over that period I've been qualified to crash in a few birds......a few of which are T-6G,  F-80 (right, the original and first jet fighter we had...I may be the only one still alive that has actually flown one) T-33 (before and after they installed the titanium buckets to keep the old J-33 engine from tossing them off the engine in flight )  F-100, B-25, B26, C-47, C-54, Grumman Albatross, T-34, and probably a few more I've forgotten about.

Flew O-1 Bird Dogs and O-2 Cessna Skymasters as a FAC in Vietnam 1967. (almost a thousand hours there and 99 Combat missions in the North end)

I've only flown one glider, and that was a T-33 on a test hop after engine change.

(Which is why I have one l less landing than takeoffs on my record.)

 

Fairly interesting times, and the retirement pay is very nice.

 

Thank you for this Commander. Saying "fairly interesting times" says alot and your retirement pay is WELL deserved. Qualified to crash in a few birds, oh boy. I can only imagine your experiences in the AF and probably won't even come close to what it's like to fly in those conditions and adverse situations. Again Lawrence thank you and please let us have some "dog fight" situations. Cheers k

new-pics-t28-flying.jpg

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Nice T-6   …….Including Flight Training I have around 750  hours in those......I participated in the ferrying operation from Davis Monthan in 1958.

The Government had sold a whole slew of them to South Korea and Japan, and we picked them up right out of the desert there and flew them VFR (no nav radios) to either Brookley AFB in Mobile, Alabama or San Francisco, California.

My war stories with this is:

1. Picked up one in the desert and found a rattlesnake in the rear cockpit.

2. The dried out prop seals would spew oil all over the windshield on takeoff.....you had to leave the canopy rolled back so you could slow it up, reach around with a rag and wipe it off.

3. Stopped off at Biggs AFB to refuel once, and left the right wing fuel tank in the detent instead of locked and sealed.

    The exhaust collector is on the right side of the engine, and during takeoff the flame ignited the fuel spraying out of the partly open fuel cap. As soon as I reduced power the fire stopped.

    The tower went ballistic and scrambled the fire trucks.   I  turned around and made a quick landing, unstrapped and jumped out, secured the cap, the tower unscrambled the fire 

    department , and I proceeded to the runway and took off for Mobile, ALA.

Never heard a word from anyone after ………….. Of course I did have to explain the singed paint on the tail surfaces to the folks running the program.

I guess maybe it's because you really can't make this sort of stuff up.

I should perhaps stop this war stories stuff before the moderators here throw me off the site.

 

And ….as a remark.…..no, the t-6G in the simulator is absolutely nothing like the live article.

If you can't simulate a random snap roll it's not a T-6G. 

Another thing you can't simulate is an open sea landing with an amphibian like the Albatross. the sim ocean swells can't get that rough.

 

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 Commander, I can't relate to this in real life but I can surely imagine it (and probably not) I should not say this but it's hilarious the rattlesnake in the rear cockpit, man that would surely hurt if you sat down on that beast. Without kidding I wish I was there under Your Command. Well,  wiping the oil off the canopy I can imagine but the fire with the fuel, oh boy would fill my diaper (not too ashamed to admit it now because I'm old ). I just hope the mod's wont stop this posting neither. Hey Nick? :) Please, Commander we need more of your "episodes". Respectfully k. (Grump)

Edited by flyingleaf

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On 7/1/2018 at 1:33 PM, lawrence aldrich said:

I'm a product of the original USAF Aviation Cadet program of the 50s. Spent 20 years in the AF, retired in 1974 as a command pilot.

 

Over that period I've been qualified to crash in a few birds......a few of which are T-6G,  F-80 (right, the original and first jet fighter we had...I may be the only one still alive that has actually flown one) T-33 (before and after they installed the titanium buckets to keep the old J-33 engine from tossing them off the engine in flight )  F-100, B-25, B26, C-47, C-54, Grumman Albatross, T-34, and probably a few more I've forgotten about.

Flew O-1 Bird Dogs and O-2 Cessna Skymasters as a FAC in Vietnam 1967. (almost a thousand hours there and 99 Combat missions in the North end)

I've only flown one glider, and that was a T-33 on a test hop after engine change.

(Which is why I have one l less landing than takeoffs on my record.)

 

Fairly interesting times, and the retirement pay is very nice.

 

Congrats! What an interesting career. I have done some reading (auto-biographies) about the FAC flying and it sounds like the pilots were sitting on a big set.

I retired a couple years ago after 40 years in both fixed and rotary wing. Did some RW in Cambodia 25+ years ago for the UN. Interesting place at the time. Interesting flying. Switched to FW full time in the mid 1990s.  I finished up doing the last 15 years for the government  which was interesting and provided for retirement. I did fire suppression between 2001-2009 and got checked out in the CL215. Fun machine. I quite enjoy flying on the computer these days in P3d and DCS. It's so nice to be retired.

Glad you survived it all. All the best. Dave

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Speaking of sitting.….FACs were (at first) having a few fatal problems with getting hit from beneath with rifle ground fire when at 1500 ft and below.

About the time I got there they were installing quarter inch steel plates under the seats.

Didn't help against 37mm AA though.

I'd like to see ORBX jazz up the Vietnam area. I go there often. Fun to fly around at 500 ft  without any potential problems with constipation.  :ph34r: 

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I remember replacements arriving in-country and asking if they could be a door gunner.  The idea was they would be able to sleep at the base camp and not have to wander around with the rest of the grunts.  The idea was usually quickly forgotten when it was pointed out that they would be sitting up there and somebody on the ground would be shooting up at their seat. 

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One of my heroes is a young man who was a Huey door gunner in Vietnam. I was in Cam Ranh Bay teaching a University of Maryland course for servicemen pursuing a college degree while also serving in-country. This man's Huey would come in right off a mission and deposit him outside our classroom for the night's three-hour class. He was one of my best students  and a real inspiration as a human being.

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On 7/6/2018 at 6:44 AM, lawrence aldrich said:

Speaking of sitting.….FACs were (at first) having a few fatal problems with getting hit from beneath with rifle ground fire when at 1500 ft and below.

About the time I got there they were installing quarter inch steel plates under the seats.

Didn't help against 37mm AA though.

I'd like to see ORBX jazz up the Vietnam area. I go there often. Fun to fly around at 500 ft  without any potential problems with constipation.  :ph34r: 

Lol  Lawrence it would be nice to have no problems with constipation. JV please do Vietnam. And Commander please write us more of your experiences. 

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