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  1. We're in on the island of Tutuila, American Samoa, where even the airport parking lots show up in lush green... Life is relaxed on the Pago Pago apron. The Navy has a P-8 Poseidon reconaissance aircraft refueled here. "So what are we going to do the next hour?" -"Hmmm, relax and watch the planes?" -"Great idea." United just opened a new service from Pago Pago to Honolulu and L.A. with Boeing 777-200LR. Most passengers have already boarded today. At the moment, containers with cargo and baggage are being loaded... ... which requires quite intensive supervision! After loading is completed, the 777 sets out to taxi to the runway. The taxiways are perfectly fitted for a widebody jet! A little bit of backtracking has to be done, though. Got to use all of the available runway length with the tropical temperatures here. Takeoff! Climbing out along the island's south coast. The flightdeck has the best views to offer... ...though the passengers in the First Class look outside from time to time, too. Drone view is always spectacular. Bye bye Pago Pago! I hope you liked my little tropical flight, thanks for watching!
  2. . Load 'em up, move 'em out. Lingering showers at Faleolo (NSFA), but forecast was for generally fair skies to the west until we approached Fiji. Afternoon thundershowers are a standard part of the weather in the summer and today will be no exception at Nadi (NFFN) 650nm southwest of Samoa. And it was very nice for most of the trip But the forecasters were right Anyhow, it was dry when we landed in Fiji As beautiful, stunning even, as it was in Samoa [ORBX], I was disappointed by [freeware] Fiji. I think you can tell. So on tomorrow to New Guinea where we'll spend a lot of time exploring Tapini and Jacksons Int'l area. Not sure we can get a C-47 safely into some of the strips hanging on a hillside, but we'll sure try. By the way, for the next few days (weeks?) you can call me Tom, Tom Frum. If you don't know why, I'll fill you in as we go.
  3. After 16 years doing sightseeing rides around the San Diego area you'd think I'd have had enough. But now that I've hung up my spurs I find myself back in the saddle, virtually, doing the very same thing. Fact is, one of the attractions to flying—beyond the challenge—is what you see out the windscreen. And the ORBX FTX Global base pack and Pago Pago add-on offer incredible vistas of the South Seas islands of Samoa and covers over 1000 square miles including 17 islands, five incredibly detailed airports jungle strips, and two international airports. On an extended oil-exploration charter that originated back in Boston, we've flown over 14,000 miles in well over 100 hours. But the beauty of Tahiti encouraged further sightseeing...I mean exploration...and Pago Pago was the logical stop, Bali next, and then New Guinea. And boy, am I glad we made the trip to Pago Pago. The place is both challenging and beautiful. Airborne out of NSTU at 0900 it was hot, humid, and hazy after overnight thunderstorms. But the weather forecast for a day-long round-robin looked good with scattered to broken mid-level clouds. A short 75nm jaunt ENE and a swing around the island put us on final to the Western Samoa airport of Fitiuta (NSFQ) Where the 2350' strip gave us some short field practice before some slightly shorter fields ahead The trickiest part in many places was turning the long-winged Gooney Bird around in the tight runway clearings. But we managed, and after a short shutdown to say hello to the friendly residents, we were off again. A 15nm hop to the next island NW Put us on final for 2000' Ofu (NSAS) The next leg was an hour further northwest To Fagali'l (NSFS) on the north coast of Falelolo Island (American Samoa) After coffee in the pretty little terminal, we flew another 20 minutes NW to 2000' Asau (NSAU), where we stretched our legs and shared the ramp with a Twotter. Headed back southeast, we did a touch and go at Moata (NSMA) And then headed to Faleolo (FSFA), which would be our jumping off point for the flight to Bali
  4. I'd almost recovered from the constant beat of Pratts in my ears, but we're in the air again. Finally. You'll recall I was hired by DCA Airways to trundle an oil exploration crew from our home base in Boston to the West Coast. But plans changed after we landed in Oakland, and we headed south to Valparaiso, Chile (not Brazil) as a jumping off point to the South Pacific on a much longer adventure. Fourteen thousand miles and 111 hours so far, and lots more to go apparently. The flight to Easter Island, we thought, would be our longest leg, but the "hop" to Tahiti was even longer, in part because I got slightly lost after landfall. We sang the praises of Mssrs Pratt and Whitney (after whom Kate and I named our cats--their predecessors were a black cat named Nimbus and white one named Cirrus), but as much as we trusted those engines we discovered when we landed at Fa'a'ā International Airport (NTAA) that our #2 engine had some serious issues. It had used over 3 gallons per hour toward the end of the flight, and we hoped it was just a bad cylinder. No such luck. There was metal in the sumps with pieces big enough to read part numbers so we knew we'd have to replace the engine. Waiting for it to arrive, literally on a slow boat to China, was no chore, however. We made many new friends of the alcoholic, female, and aviation persuasion and vowed we'd be back. The wait for the engine reminds me of a friend, the mechanic who used to do the annual inspection on our SNJ (AT-6). He was the lead engineer on a very rich guy's Gulfstream based at LAX. He'd been the only mechanic for the SkyTypers T-6 team at the ripe age of 18, back in the day, so he knows a thing or two about round engines and Texans, too. When the boss's jet unexpectedly needed an engine in Paris, they didn't want to send the honcho home in undignified airline First Class. So they put the engine in the hold of a 747 and sent my friend with it, and two days later the G4 was ready to rock and roll. Hey, only cost about a quarter million dollars, what's that compared to a missed business deal? As an aside, most big jets don't come with engines--you lease them separately. For that matter, most don't come with interiors, either. You pay for all that separately, too. Heated gold bath towel-bars in the loo aren't standard equipment, ya know. But I digress. With the engine hung on our Gooney Bird and tested on a couple short local flights we found and fixed a few leaks here and there. Radial engines always drip, it seems—as the saying goes, round engines don't leak, they're just marking their territory. (The other version is if they don't leak they don't have any oil in them.) Oce we got things squared away, we were ready to press on. The Tahiti dalliance suggested to those paying for the gas and my virtual wages, that Pago Pago was a good next stop, with some investigation of the local airports there, and then on to Bali for more of the same. Frankly, I was getting a bit bored with the long overwater legs anyway, DR and celestial navigation having proved remarkably accurate and not too difficult if you pay attention. Being bored with long over-water flights reminds me...here we go again...of two chaps who recognized a business opportunity ferrying eight used Cessna 421s to Australia. They set out from Santa Paula, north of Los Angeles, via Hawaii and the South Sea Islands as a flight of two with big tanks instead of seats in the back. First flight was scary as hell, they said, at one point seven hours from the nearest land. The second delivery flight was a nail-biter, but by the time they'd flown the third pair halfway around the world and down under, they were getting a bit bored with the whole thing. When they flew the last two aircraft over, one pilot told me, he called his buddy in the other aircraft and said, "I'm gonna crawl in the back on top of the tanks and take a snooze. If anything goes wrong or when it's time to switch tanks, give me a call on the radio." Anyway, we flight planned about nine hours for our flight from Tahiti to Pago Pago and I'd learned our lesson about arrival times on the last leg, so we planned to arrive just after sunup so we could use star shots all night long to keep track of our position. Good plan but it didn't work out that way. Launched at 2110 local, estimating Tahiti at 0600 their time, including an hour time change (GMT-10 to GMT-11). Strong crosswind on departure and overcast skies didn't make for a promising sendoff. We droned along for a while, down low at 3000' below the Westerlies. In fact for the first couple of hours we had a tailwind component. But we were mostly under a high overcast. There wre a few breaks that allowed the moon to shine through, but they weren't big enough to allow us to get a star shot with the sextant. There were embedded thunderstorms in the forecast, and we saw lots of lightning, but managed to avoid running into the side of a monster. Toward morning we did get a long look at the moon, but it was almost dead ahead of us and useless as a source for an LOP. Finally, the sky started to lighten up, and we could see a dim horizon ahead. Before long we had enough light to see the weather we'd been flying through And right on time, terra firma appeared out of the gloom. Only one problem. Wrong island Our DR objective was intentionally south of Pago Pago so we'd know we had to turn northeast to make landfall, And we did, alright, but we were farther west than anticipated and made landfall on Upolo the beautiful large island west of Pago Pago. So we turned southeast and flew another half hour Before making land fall again, on yet another beautiful island. Airport in sight, we dropped the gear and knew we had it made. It had been a rough flight, thanks to the bad weather, but the beautiful islands welcomed us and we knew the next few sightseeing flights around the area would be tremendous fun.
  5. I'm feeling the heat today in Tim's and Ken's tropical paradise ......... Only cool spot seems to be the this cottage patio overlooking the nearby beach .... I think I'll go for a swim later in the day ......... Orr, m...mmaybe not !! Thank-you, for looking in .
  6. I have now at last uploaded two videos for Pago Pago to Youtube. In the first, I offer up a quick look at Pago Pago Int, followed by a Helicopter flight right around the island in a DoDo Sim 206X chopper. In the 2nd video, I show albeit very briefly the remaining 6 airports in the package. These are my 2nd and third uploads to YouTube, so hopefully they will improve in time This information is posted in another forum area, if someone could tell me how to edit the post to avoid what is now a double post, I would appreciate it. Cheers Pete
  7. Hey! I got a phonecall from a little charter airline in Samoa. They needed a pilot for the DHC-300 Twin Otter... I said yes, off course! I decided to take a few shots of a flight from Pago Pago Airport to Fitiuta Airport. Enjoy!!! Its around 2 pm and we make a short hop to the island with the little Fitiuta Airport. Right now we have the typical early evening rush at the Pago Pago intl. Airport. Starting the walk-around by checking the left wing and the flaps. Next checking the left engine. And the frontwheel. And finally the tail. Jesus.... a US Navy 737 parking at the ramp!!!!! Nice to see that guy here. Today we are flying some freight. On the loading letter they saying its some food and clothings as well as a medical package!! Must be important! Okay startup complete...engines are running...all looks clear and clean! On the runway. We are cleared for takeoff! Such a beautiful view, isnt it!? Passing another airport with a difficult approach. The town of Fitiuta. Looks like a peaceful and nice place to live! Airport is in sight. A sweet little right turn. Such a awesome approach!!!! "Fitiuta Traffic, Samoa Trans 142 landing on runway 12, Fitiuta Traffic" After the landing a spotter gave me this amazing picture!!! Thanks to him! C'mon baby...get down!! The last meters!! Backtracking on the runway. No problem for the Twotter. i realy like the name hehehe. Taxiing to the little ramp. Nice little paring ramp One more Twotter here, but its a PAX DHC-300! At the parking position. Shutdown complete! Unloading our cargo. Seems like a busy day here in Fitiuta! Now its time to take a break and watching the airplanes. I realy like the airport and the island!!!! So thats it! Quite a lot but thanks for take a look on my shots! Now I need to fly back to Pago Pago! Bye!
  8. Aerobatics flight in Extra 300 in American Samoa, Pago Pago. How beautiful this scenery is! Look at the top left for flight values. Unedited video: "what you see is what actually did happen", but with music I was listening to when flying... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XeIptDz6Lw8
  9. I installed the Pago Pago airport and it looks great. I have a ton of add-on scenery, so I only "enable" the areas that I'm using or load times are too long. When I disable the ORBX Pago Pago airport and use the pago pago airport, I get scenery issues. Water covers land, the plane seems to be in between the runway and land, etc. Also, this affects other airports, especially if they are near wather. If Pago Pago is enabled, everything is fine, when it's not - I get scenery problems. Any idea what's going on? Thanks, David
  10. Carenado S550 Citation II. Short flight between NSTU Pago Pago International Airport and NSFA Faleolo International Airport
  11. A while ago Tim Harris recommended this small ai pack for pago pago. I really enjoyed having traffic at pago pago... However... I've moved from fsx to P3D and V# at that which I found out sadly, I cant install to. Are there any versions available or updates for the V3 version of P3D? or maybe someway to install it? Thanks a million and appreciate your help always.. Flyboy.
  12. I thought the cable was hazard enough and now I just can't get away from them enjoy Taph
  13. Scenes from a Canuck's holiday in the Tropics ............... ............ brought to you by REX and Orbx. Thank-you, for flying along !
  14. Small glitch on my computer using FTX Pago Pago. See screenshot showing Ocean flowing up the side of hill. Follow Rwy 8 straight out to tip of island.
  15. The new Samoa scenery looks great. It made my passenger scream. Or was it me flying? :-D Watch the video on my Youtube channel: https://youtu.be/ZxD-qjMdrKs René
  16. Late arrival, but who cares After exploring sat in a beach bar with a sundowner Also all too soon, departure over crystal clear water Enjoy Taph
  17. This is a inspiration of how to enhance your PAGO PAGO Experience with a bunch of free ships for FSX. These Ships are all Pilotable for FSX and some of them can also be used for AI. The fit perfect for Samoa. links to the models below!# Four Masted Barque FS200 4/FSX Four Masted Barque "Passat". FS2004/FSX/Acceleration/P3D package four masted barque Passat as pilotable boats or as AI ships. This tall ship was one of the famous German "Flying P-liners" from the Laeisz ships company. She was build by the Blohm and Voss shipyard Hamburg in 1911. First she was a pure cargo ship, faster and more efficient than steamers of that era. She carried nitrat from Chile to Germany or grain between Australia and Europe. In 1952, Passat and the similar Pamir were converted to freight carring school ships with a 1000 hp auxillary engine. Pamir sank 1957 in a heavy storm and Passat was recommisioned after that tragedy. She is since 1959 a museum ship in the harbor of Travemunde/Lubeck/Germany. This addon provides one pilotable version with all thirty-four sails set and a second version with striked sails, running with engine. Twenty-four FSX cameras let you explore the beautiful ship from high above in the masts, on the very detailed decks or from external views. Using FS2004 there are seventeen virtual panel look-around views. Additionally, there are two AI models supposed to be used with the great tool AI-carriers2. FSDS 3.5 model and photorealistic 2D panel by Erwin Welker. Doublepack Tea Clipper Cutty Sark FS2004/FSX Doublepack Tea Clipper Cutty Sark. FS2004/FSX/Acceleration Doublepack pilotable tea clipper "Cutty Sark". This famous fast tea clipper from 1870 with a length of overall 85 m carried up to 35 sails with 3000 square meters and reached a max. speed of about 17 knots. Since 1957 this beautiful ship lays in a drydock at Greenwich, England. In May 2007, during a great renovation, the wooden hull was almost destroyed by a great fire but the steel frames and all the removed parts like masts and mahogany deckhouses survived. Today the whole ship is restored. This add-on provides one version with backwind and eight stunsails and a second version with wind from the side and a different set of sails. Twenty-one FSX cameras let you explore the beautiful ship from high above in the masts, on the very detailed decks or from external views. Using FS2004 there are seventeen virtual panel look-around views. FSDS 3.5 model and photorealistic 2D panel by Erwin Welker. FSX Galleon Neptune FS2004/FSX Galleon Neptune, from the 17th century. This sailing ship is a replica for Roman Polanski's movie "Pirates" with Walter Matthau as pirate captain. On this model the oversized figurehead "Neptune" has been replaced with a scary reaper. The boat is almost complete rigged with hundreds of ropes. Fourteen cannons and two Jolly Roger flags are animated. Twenty-eight cameras let you explore the whole ship: the deck, below the decks and you can enjoy the sailors' views from high above in the masts. Using FS2004 there are seventeen virtual panel look-around views. FSDS 3.5 model made by Erwin Welker.. HMS Bounty FS2004/FSX Four Masted Barque "Passat". FS2004/FSX/Acceleration/P3D package four masted barque Passat as pilotable boats or as AI ships. This tall ship was one of the famous German "Flying P-liners" from the Laeisz ships company. She was build by the Blohm and Voss shipyard Hamburg in 1911. First she was a pure cargo ship, faster and more efficient than steamers of that era. She carried nitrat from Chile to Germany or grain between Australia and Europe. In 1952, Passat and the similar Pamir were converted to freight carring school ships with a 1000 hp auxillary engine. Pamir sank 1957 in a heavy storm and Passat was recommisioned after that tragedy. She is since 1959 a museum ship in the harbor of Travemunde/Lubeck/Germany. This addon provides one pilotable version with all thirty-four sails set and a second version with striked sails, running with engine. Twenty-four FSX cameras let you explore the beautiful ship from high above in the masts, on the very detailed decks or from external views. Using FS2004 there are seventeen virtual panel look-around views. Additionally, there are two AI models supposed to be used with the great tool AI-carriers2. FSDS 3.5 model and photorealistic 2D panel by Erwin Welker. Three Mast Barque Alexander Von Humboldt II FS2004/FSX Three Mast Barque Alexander Von Humboldt II. This beautiful German tall ship was laid down in 2008 and was launched in 2011. It replaces the Alexander Von Humboldt I, which was laid down 1906 as lighthouse ship and was converted to a barque with green sails in 1988. The package contains pilotable and AI versions. Both with twenty-four sails or with removed sails. These models are extremely detailed and reach the limits for compiling to a MDL. Fourteen FSX cameras let you explore the beautiful ship and the virtual decks. Using FS2004 there are eighteen virtual panel lookaround views. FDE tuning by Knud Kristofferson. FSDS 3.5 model made by Erwin Welker.
  18. Airborned from Pago Pago (NSTU) a short roundflight in the vintage Staggerwing, enjoy the views:
  19. Hi there, Please take a look at these screenshots from FSX Pago Pago I took today. This first time I flew around NSTU, I did not notice the extremely bright white water textures around the airport. It now does not look that realistic. The only change that I can recall happening on my PC since the 1st time was the auto updated FTX Central Version (29/06/2015). Are these textures (particularly the white water textures) correct ? Does everyone else see similar water textures around the airport? I looked on the FTX website under the Pago Pago screenshots and could not see these bright white water textures. The season is "winter" (i.e. as it is now) and the time is the middle of the day. It is not so bad at dawn and dusk. If they are not correct, any ideas what might be causing this? I tried switching FTX regions and tried with and without Hybrid mode - with no apparent change to the textures. I run DX10 with Steve's Fixer (but I have always run DX10 and did not notice these bright white textures the 1st time I flew in the area). Thanks and regards,
  20. The decision to install the magnificent FTX-scenery package Pago Pago was quick decided by me -> see the difference via follow 2 shots: Default FSX scenery of NSTU at Samoa After install of the FTX-package Pago Pago Now a joy to fly all over the Island-group and land on the airports, hereby back at NSTU:
  21. As I admired so many previous postings with that wonderful tropical scenery of Pago Pago, it was clear to me...a must have! I made a first flight from The main airport NSTU with a Twin Otter of the further eastern polynesian airline 'Moorea' and took off eastwards to fly via Arutangag(one of the Cook Islands) back to Moorea at French Polynesia. Enjoy with me my first 100 NMiles: Still about 550 NM to Aitutaki-airstrip on Arutanga and the day after the 570NM to Moorea...over the vast ocean
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